PLC’s: A To Do List (Intro)

One of my jobs at my school includes helping to facilitate our PLCs. For those of you not fluent in this acronym of the educational alphabet soup, PLC stands for Professional Learning Community. In lieu of going into the history of PLCs at our school (7 years strong now) or attempting the explanation of what a PLC is (The DuFours do that much better than I can), I’m going to get down to brass tacks. No more theory. Just the to do list. What would you do in a thriving PLC? I mean really do. On a daily basis. And I don’t just mean sit around and talk educational theory or share the ever dreaded “Well, what I do” stories –although both of those happen in PLC time far more than I think healthy. No. I’m going to give you some action.

Good PLC’s have four main goals. Really, PLC members should spend their time answering (through action and concrete results, in my opinion) the following four questions:

1) What do we want students to know?

2) How will we know they know it?

3) What do we do if they don’t know it?

4) What will we do if they already know it?

So in the next series of blog posts, I’m going to give activities, concrete results, or action steps that members of thriving PLCs should be taking to help answer these questions.

My audience for these posts chiefly consists of anyone who is in a PLC that isn’t working and wants to change something, anyone who is attempting to facilitate a PLC and doesn’t know what to do, or anyone who wants to start a PLC and needs some back-up juice for your proposal to the administration. Fair warning, these next posts might be a little irrelevant to anyone following who isn’t an educator or for those of you who are not interested in PLC work.

So if you’re intrigued, keep reading onto the next post. (I’ll link it here once I write it).

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About epdwilliams

Junior High English Teacher The Westminster Schools
This entry was posted in Education, PLCs and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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